Capital & Contract Management

Manage contract workflows from start to finish, from contractor/supplier selection through contract closeout including the related buyouts, pay requests and change orders. With our capital and contract management solutions, you can facilitate contracts and changes throughout the project, resulting in a 20% reduction in turnaround time.

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Make real-time decisions as you gain visibility into metrics, KPIs and trends, driving continuity in operations.

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Our document management solution helps you streamline the capture, review, management and distribution of project documents. Because all your project documentation is stored in a centralized repository, you can reduce processing time by 30%.

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Estimating & Project Cost Management

Our project cost management solutions help you create more accurate and timely project estimates, increase your forecasting accuracy, and improve the anticipated project ROI.

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Field Execution Management

Manage work packages and daily crew plans to deliver and capture predictable results in the field, reducing project costs 10%.

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Integrated Project Controls Platform

Only InEight provides a complete portfolio of capital project management software that supports enterprise-wide digital transformation.

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Planning, Scheduling & Risk

Collaboratively create and risk-adjust plans to achieve more than 75% confidence in project execution.

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Safety, Quality & Commissioning

Capture and analyze safety, compliance and quality data directly from the field, reducing rework by 10%.

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Virtual Design & Construction

Use an aggregated 3D model as a common data environment, increasing clash resolution efficiency by more than 200%

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Connected Data: The Construction Game Changer with ENR

 

44 Min Watch Time

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Bigger projects demand better decision making. If we start a project with the end in mind, we can measure every decision against whether the outcome will move us closer or further away. Project control software can help bring this strategy to life by connecting data and guiding better outcomes across the project lifecycle. Historically, this connected data view has been almost impossible with point solutions.

This webinar looks at:

  • How jobs in the office and the field have evolved with access to connected and visual data
  • How the best project software today spans business processes and demands access to consistent and trusted data, for use in design and planning, in the field and in the boardroom
  • How reporting and dashboards provide live consolidated data regarding project progress and health; helping you guide better outcomes throughout the entire project lifecycle

Scott Seltz:

Hello and welcome to this webinar, Connected Data, the Construction Game Changer. This event is brought to you by Engineering News-Record and sponsored by InEight. Hi, I’m Scott Seltz, publisher at ENR and your moderator for this webinar, and thank you for joining us today. As capital projects become more complex, sharing project data with key stakeholders becomes an essential building block to increasing job site productivity. Integrating data related to materials, people and systems fosters a collaborative approach to work packaging and results in more predictable outcomes.

Scott Seltz:

In this webinar, we will explore how connected data maximises visibility and bridges the gap of project certainty. Please join me in welcoming today’s presenter, Mark Edwards, Chief Delivery Officer at InEight. Mark joined InEight in 2018 as the company’s Chief Delivery Officer. In his role, he’s responsible for product development, customer success, service delivery, training, in InEight’s project management office. Prior to InEight, Mark served as the Chief Product Officer with the Kiewit Technology Group. Now, before we start our presentation today, please enjoy this brief instructional video on how to use your webinar console.

Video:

Welcome to this webinar. Before we begin the presentation, I want to provide you with a few housekeeping items. On your screen you will see a task bar with icons. Each icon is assigned to a particular element of today’s webinar. Click on the person icon to learn more about today’s speakers. Throughout the presentation, you can network with others or submit questions to the speakers in the Q and A chat box next to the slides. Download resources from the cloud icon. After the webinar’s over, please take our survey to tell us how we did. Today’s event is being recorded and archived and will be available within 24 hours. For on-demand questions or comments, send us an email by clicking need help, email us. If you experience any technical issues today, please refresh your browser by hitting F5 for PC or command R for Mac. And now I’m excited to turn it over to today’s moderator.

Scott Seltz:

Don’t forget to submit your questions during the presentation. And later in the program, our presenter will address as many as possible. Today’s event is being recorded and archived on enr.com/webinars so you can share this presentation with your colleagues, and now I’m excited to turn it over to today’s presenter, Mark Edwards.

Mark Edwards:

Thank you, Scott. I appreciate it. Good afternoon, everybody. I’m really looking forward to the next few minutes with everyone. Before I get started, I appreciate everybody joining on Veterans Day. Special thank you to all of our active and retired servicemen and women. I’m sure with the 60 plus folks we’ve got out there, we’ve got one or two and hats off to you and your dedication to our country.

Mark Edwards:

As Scott said, my name’s Mark Edwards. I’m the Chief Delivery Officer for InEight. I’ve been doing that a couple of years, and prior to that, I spent time at Kiewit doing kind of the same thing but really driving project efficiency across a bunch of Kiewit projects. So I often tell people that as far as the roles within InEight, I probably have the most exciting ones because I get to see all the way from the beginning of an idea. We get that kind of vetted in the product life cycle, develop it, deploy it, and seeing it work for our customers on construction projects is extremely exciting.

Today I’m going to tell you a little bit about that evolution and my experience with customers, because that’s one thing that I probably like most is the time I get to spend with customers using our software, as well as developing new processes and understanding where they can get the benefits of that. So any presentation having to do with changing the game of construction is probably not complete unless you have a slide like this that shows the ever popular slide that points out “construction sure hasn’t gained in productivity in many, many years,” and then actually what you … That obviously the trend, if you look over there on the right, value-added per hour work construction is decreasing.

Mark Edwards:

And so, I don’t believe. It seems like every time we have this discussion, it’s like, well, it really is about technology. Then I would tell you that in my opinion that there’s plenty of technology and that it is not a lack of technology problem because we’ve got SharePoint, we’ve got document control systems, systems to help us manage risks, systems for managing subcontracts and that kind of thing. We try to do better. We get it signed electronically, and maybe that drives some efficiency.

Mark Edwards:

We’ve got estimating systems. Everybody’s still using lots of Excel out there, PowerPoints to bring it all together and help communicate. We have a totally separate system to manage equipment and maintenance of that equipment, the systems to develop daily plans and procure everything, and then finally, we’ve got to get all that stuff connected on a job site. So we’ve got to get the network connectivity, the Wi-Fi. We’ve got mobile devices and we got to get the stuff to the field.

Mark Edwards:

So the issue is not a technology problem. The issue early is that with all this technology, it’s disconnected technology. And so to connect that, we’ve got to introduce a bunch of people that take data from system A and put it in system B, and the way system B needs it, so system B can do its work, and that just permeates the entire construction life cycle all the way from engineering through startup and commissioning.

Mark Edwards:

So, where did we start? As I said, this is the need … I believe every construction company and project has identified and recognised the need for technology, which is on the far left of this curve, but it truly is a curve. It’s not something that we can do overnight, but there are steps that you absolutely have to take if you were going to change the game of construction using our data and becoming more efficient. And so what I’m going to talk through here is a few items in that evolution and how we can then benefit from that evolution as we go.

Mark Edwards:

So, as I said, the start of it is really just identifying where we’re going to evolve, identifying where those business problems are that we’re going to attack. Through that evolution, there will be several key things where we use data that reveals issues and things that can be addressed throughout the process. We got to go attack three things. We got to have some consolidated data. We’ve got to categorize the work and use the standard ways to categorize those. And then finally, once we get there, focus on data cleanliness, data protection and those kinds of things. And if we do all that in a set of steps, I believe that those are the things that will lead to a revolution in how we manage and the way we use data to manage our construction projects.

Mark Edwards:

So let’s start off with some of the data consolidation. There are several tools that we have, whether it’s Tableau, Power BI, SQL Server, that we can use to bring data together from the disparate systems that are up at the top of this slide and drive it to some visualisations that can start giving you insights to your projects that you may not have otherwise had. The key is to, over on the left, it says, begin with the end in mind, and I believe that’s really important because as you’re looking at a project and how you’re going to run that, the focus tends to be on the applications at the top of this. What are we going to use for subcontract management? How’s it going to work? What are we going to use for dock control? How’s that going to work? How’s the ERP going to play into this thing? Where are we going to get our people?

Mark Edwards:

And immediately once you start the work and you make some of those decisions, you realise, well, the way we’re going to operationally run thing day-to-day and manage how we’re doing relative to our goal becomes a reporting and data visualisation exercise. And so, step one is to bring all that data together in a place where you can start getting value and seeing issues early. The problem with this is it still just brings the data together. There’s still disparity data sources, and we still have places all strewn along the top here where we’ve got folks involved with moving data from system A to system B and using key data relationships to make sure that system A and system B talk to each other and the data can be related. Without that, the value of the data, the visualisations is minimal.

Mark Edwards:

The other thing that this gives us is it is focused on the project. So we’ve now got a system where we’ve got people putting data together. We’re consolidating that into a really nice visualization mechanism, but it’s all about that project. You would then treat each one of these projects uniquely and the same way, but the value that can be gleaned from this work really needs to be done as we start looking across projects. So that’s why I bring up data, the work categorisation. So one of the things that we talk about is common codes in which to put the work breakdown structures and those kinds of things, and this starts to give us incredibly key cross-project insights, and we can use these in terms of productivity, benchmarking in a bunch of other places.

Mark Edwards:

You see here, this is purely an example. There’s no magic here. I have used a civil example that I’ve used on projects where you break down some of the civil work into the codes on the far left. And then those codes are even further broken down into sub codes as you see on the right, whether it’s general provision or earth work. The key here is not to get too crazy categorising work. I often use the analogy of, when I’m trying to get organised and I’ve got a bunch of files, oftentimes when I’m doing that ahead of time, I will create files for everything under the sun thinking I’m going to get so doggone organised that I’m not going to lose anything.

Mark Edwards:

Well, what happens over time is, if I have a file for all of the appliances in my kitchen that’s too granular or the level of detail, and so I need to boil it up a little bit because I can’t really manage it, that level of detail. I can’t just maintain the job. And it’s very tempting when I’ve been going through this exercise with some of our customers to get down to a level that’s so granular, it makes it difficult to reuse it across projects. And that’s what key is the ability to then categorize the different work into these categories so we can start using those to better manage how we’re doing work and what our best costs looks like. The organizational discipline is incredible so that you can work with every project in your organization to properly categorize these things, to begin to harness the power that this data provides.

Mark Edwards:

Let me talk about a couple of examples of that. I mentioned that now with these categorized codes, we can begin to look across projects for trends. Here’s a couple examples where we’ve got a portfolio analysis up in the kind of the ones kind of sitting behind on the left. You can see that one in one view I can take a look at, I got 18 projects. I’ve got how much revenue, where am I from a percent complete. If you look at the bottom, it’s really a list at that bottom matrix there on that screenshot, is a list of projects, and you can see financially kind of where they are, whether it’s how are we doing on our man-hours? How are we doing on productivity, et cetera.

Mark Edwards:

Without those common codes, you lose insight to that across projects. You might still have it within a project which is beneficial in and of itself, but certainly not a portfolio view. And then with the tools that I’m talking about here, a lot of you probably realise these are Power BI visualizations, you can dive into a project and actually start seeing, okay, so if I’ve got a problem or it looks like I might have a problem on a certain project, what’s going on there and be able to dig down without having to dive through every single file and figure out where the problem is.

Mark Edwards:

Likewise, the change summary is another example of a visualization that is incredibly powerful. When you start looking across your projects, you start seeing things like … So what this is, is potential change orders. So issues become a potential change order and then become a client change order. You can look across all your projects and see, “Oh, wow, look at that. It looks like the issues are going crazy on this project, but it looks like we’re okay on this one.” And look at that over time, that starts to give you early indications of where you may have trouble.

Mark Edwards:

And as we talked about early on, these are the kinds of things that the transparency and sharing data with our owners is very, very powerful because then it’s not a surprise, right? They see it early, they know what’s going on and using these visualizations is an incredibly powerful way to help that. Another example of being able to look at your data across projects, one of my customers, I’ll never forget the first time I showed a report like this on a job site. I was sitting there in a job trailer with a bunch of project guys and we were looking at their data in SSRS. This is a SSRS report. And, this is an example of a particular work categorization. So excavation load only work.

Mark Edwards:

And the histogram at the bottom shows a unit rate, cubic yards unit rates. So on the far right, the unit rates are higher and in this case better. On the far left, those are worse than the highlighted one. So this particular job, we were looking at it and they’re like, “Oh my God, we’re just knocking it out of the park on this kind of work.” And as we dug into this data, ran this report, we can now see that exact same work across six or eight other projects across the entire United States and see how are they’re doing relative to any other work that’s been done in this category.

Mark Edwards:

And so in this case, although this particular job was doing very well, there were three other jobs that had done better than them and five that had done worse. And so the beauty of this is now I can see, okay, so this other job, it did better than me. If you click into that, you can start to see, all right, so who’s running that work. Maybe I can contact those individuals and figure out what did they do to achieve that unit rate when I thought I was doing so well. So this cross-project insight with the work categorization becomes incredibly powerful and a way to help drive efficiency across a bunch of projects, and those project teams may never ever have talked to each other before. And so it really it helps collaboration and it helps drive productivity.

Mark Edwards:

So a couple of pretty good examples of what these work category codes can do. It’s not simple. Don’t get me wrong. This is something that takes a lot of collaboration across various parts of your businesses to come up with what those categories might look like for your companies. At InEight, we’ve got a place to start, but we tweak that all the time for customers as they implement our systems. So now the evolution continues, right? So we’ve got categorized codes, we’ve got project specific insights around using these visualization tools.

Mark Edwards:

But you’ll notice in this slide, I now have started to introduce a couple of new analytical tools with Python and R to begin to use that data in ways to generate some analytical models. And also I’ve introduced the database there where we’re starting to feed rather than going straight into a visualization tool and just using the visualization tool to tie data together and give visualizations. We put it in a database that now starts to give us some really good history and use the power of database technology then to feed whether it’s Power BI, Tableau, SQL Server, and then drive the model solutions with R and Python. This is a necessary kind of step positioning us for what comes next, but what you realise quickly is I still got a bunch of people around the top.

Mark Edwards:

I still have people tying this stuff together, and it has to get done in order to put it into a database. We still haven’t addressed the productivity problem that I started with. So that’s where we go next, is we now have to start to address these key areas where we can consolidate some of these applications and start bringing them together, and that’s what we’ve got at InEight where we’ve got a modular set of systems that you can pick from based on where you believe you’ve got maybe the best or the worst in some cases, business problem that you want to address, whether that’s models and design, documents and contracts, costs and quantities, plans and schedules.

Mark Edwards:

But then, each one of those is designed to share a data model so that you don’t have people clubbing the data in between them, but you leverage the power of those, and then over time, if you want to, let’s say that models and data was your kind of biggest issue and you want just start there, we get that list and then we can add documents and contracts, and it plugs in, in a modular way. Those applications within that box or products within that box are integrated between them and then we provide that data to a common database, and that evolution then starts to address the people part of … The overhead that you have to have on these projects starts to go away.

Mark Edwards:

You still have people using those models and design, and you still have document control folks and contract managers, but they’re not clubbing data in between the two. They are just using those applications in the way they’re designed, stuffs data into the database that’s pre-integrated. And then you can use these tools in a much more rapid fashion to give you the data you need, and that rapid fashion is key because I can tell you how many projects I’ve been on where they spend thousands of man-hours just pulling together reports, and those man-hours are spent and obviously it takes time to spend those man-hours. So it takes a week, week and a half to even figure out how you did a week and a half ago, and by that time it’s too late.

Mark Edwards:

You have these module applications that feed to a database that give you that data right out of the bottom of it as the work is happening and you know a lot more about your job a lot more quickly. I’ve kind of already touched on this next slide as I’ve been talking to this one, but once you evolve to a place where you’ve got all of those applications integrated and connected, it enables incredibly powerful stuff, right? So the common database and history, you can start looking at benchmarking in those work categories, and look at quotes, look at productivity by region of the country, by work category, whatever, and start to use those benchmarks in your estimates and quotes as you chase and work.

Mark Edwards:

It also gives you the opportunity to look for anomalies rather than somebody searching through an SSRS report or for [inaudible 00:22:36] Excel spreadsheet for anomalies. The system can help you find those and base that determination on a moving average or whatever the case may be, but you have rules and highlight items for people to go take a look at rather than try to find them themselves, and that really, touches on the same thing from a patterns and data relationships perspective, right? That is really what starts to drive these other things. You’re looking for patterns in the data. You can do visualizations that you’ve never done before, and this connected integrated platform is what enables all that.

Mark Edwards:

Let me give you a couple examples here about other pretty incredible things that you can do with this data once you have it connected in ways that we’ve discussed. One of them is, during the estimate phase, what this is, is one of my customers put together what they call the project probability of success index, and this is really all about estimation. Every company I work with spends hundreds of thousands of dollars pursuing projects, obviously that they don’t know for sure whether they’re going to win or lose. And we spend an awful lot of money on ones that maybe we shouldn’t, and so this is really trying to get at that.

Mark Edwards:

So if you take the integrated data we talked about, put that together in a model that says, okay, I believe I can come up with a classification scheme that says, should I or should I not chase this job? So the scatter plot in the upper right corner here, if you look at the upper section, every dot represents an estimate. That top horizontal chunk represents estimates that were chased and lost. The bottom chunk represents estimates that were chased and won. The probability of success index is on the X-axis.

Mark Edwards:

So you can see that as you move further to the right with a high probability of success index, you’ll see that the light … If you said, look, I’m not going to bid anything that’s not higher than 70, you’re obviously going to win a bunch and there’s going to be some that you don’t go after, or you do go after and lose, right? As you move further and further to the left, the number that you chase and win, and the number that you chase and lose goes up. So this is really, it just gives you another data point that says, man, if we have anything lower than say 28%, we probably shouldn’t do that, because just look how many that you lose. Now, you certainly would not chase some that looks like you’d win.

Mark Edwards:

But for those folks making the decisions about what jobs to go after and what jobs to let go by, using the connected data is a great indicator. It’s not going to say you should or shouldn’t ever do it, that doesn’t eliminate the human decision-making, but it gives us a data point where we can begin to eliminate some of that bias and at least highlight it when you decide whether you’re going to go after a pursuit. So that’s a little bit about during the estimate and helping us spend that money for pursuits in the best way possible using the data that we have from our connection systems.

Mark Edwards:

Another example is during the operation. So throughout the operation, there are a set of variables that one of my customers put together that indicated, hey, we may have a problem here. This job might be going to a place where we’ve got an issue, and this particular customer called those tripwires. So, each of these tripwires basically as a variable that when that value on that variable gets over a threshold, that trips the trip wire, whether it’s direct hours, indirect hours, or direct and indirect costs, sorry.

Mark Edwards:

Man-hours or some other factors you can start to see then on the graph down below over time the number of tripwires that, that’s hit, and you can also see as total goes to the top, you can start to look at, we may have a problem where the trip wires are such, or the variables are such that the operational issues on that job may start chewing into our margin, or whether it’s a little bit, or a lot, or possibly even looks like it’s going to cost us money rather than just chewing into our margin.

Mark Edwards:

So this data is not just something that we use kind of on a project retrospective perspective, it can be used on a weekly, monthly whatever basis like this, to help us attack operational problems before they become a problem. And again, kind of to the transparency issue that we talked about earlier, this is the kind of stuff that our owners are asking for more and more. If there’s an issue, let’s go chase that issue early. They want to know about it, and we want to be transparent about what we’re going after.

Mark Edwards:

The final example I have here around using this data is a safety example. And I have a customer that’s working on this as we speak, but it looks highly promising that we’ll be able to take some of our project demographics, our man-hours, the status financially of a job, man-hour change data over time, and maybe even the regional history or a team history of the individuals on those jobs, develop a model where we can predict based on those inputs the probability of somebody getting hurt. And I can’t imagine something more important than being able to say, you know what? Given these variables, it looks like that we might have a highly likely case of somebody getting hurt on that job by the end of this week. And so you can take immediate action to do whatever you think necessary to eliminate that possibility.

Mark Edwards:

Now, obviously, if you do that, you’re going take some actions that maybe somebody is not going to get hurt. But again, I can’t imagine deciding, you know what? We’re not going to do that and take the risk. Again, none of this is meant to … It’s not a sure thing, but if we can highlight cases where it might be thing or a possibility, and we can take action on that and send more people home every day to their families without getting hurt, it’s a wonderful thing.

Mark Edwards:

So I think as I’ve gone through this and talked about the evolution, all the way starting from just consolidating data across the plethora of systems we’ve got bringing it into a place where we can just visualize it and show trends and people are visual people. Everybody I’ve met can more easily glean data from a visualization than they can a bunch of numbers. And so that is incredibly powerful, but as I said, that really helps you on a project specific basis.

Mark Edwards:

So the next steps are to bring that into categorizing work, start putting our work breakdown structures into a work and associating them to a work category, giving us cross project visibility, and be able to look at those trends. And now we go after the efficiency problem where we start implementing systems that are integrated among themselves, feeding data into a common data structure, so now you continue with the visualizations you have, and you start to start begin … You become more and more efficient on the day-to-day operation where you eliminate the need for people to club in the data between these systems.

Mark Edwards:

So yes, we’ve evolved to a connected technology, integrated technology, eliminating overhead, and now we can focus on the keeping that data clean, protecting that data, because it has now become one of the best assets you’ve got, and it also just makes you better over time because you now have data that you can chase better work. Your clients can count on you more because they know that you have the data and the operational data. So you can chase work that matters. Again, reduce the overhead. Communicate plans in a timely way and how we did on those plans to the people on the job. Get early operational warnings and keep people safer.

Mark Edwards:

And I believe as we go chase the things that I’ve just talked about, that will change the game in construction. And until we do those kinds of things, I believe we will continue to see lots of technology, but also consistently low productivity because we’ve got people working on non-integrated solutions. So with that said, I will thank you again all for joining. I will turn it back over to Scott.

Scott Seltz:

Thank you, Mark. That was a great presentation. Before we have you address some questions that have been submitted by our viewers throughout the program, I want to remind our viewers we’d love your feedback and our webinars survey to help improve our programs, which is available on your screen now, or you can fill it out at the conclusion of the webinar. Also, if you want to learn more about the topic of this webinar, please visit the cloud icon on your webinar console to download additional information from InEight. And if you have a question for Mark, please submit that now in the ask a question box on your webinar console. And Mark, one of our viewers about halfway through asked the question, what factors are influencing your decision to chase or not to chase a project?

Mark Edwards:

That’s a great question. I was just looking at that too. There’s a lot, but as we were developing that model, some of the things we considered was, who is the client? What’s our history with that client? What industry is it in, what vertical? How have we performed in that vertical? Again, looking back at some of the account code stuff I talked about, the work categorizations, and so taking those elements together and seeing, did you win or lose based on, that’s just an example, but did you win or lose in those areas, then that feeds into that, should you chase it or not a model.

Scott Seltz:

Good. Another viewer is asking, I think they may not have caught some of your presentation, but the question was, did you say that this system tracks the jobs bid versus one and give stats on that information?

Mark Edwards:

No. So that the stats on that information would be gleaned from those estimates over time. So you would use, for example, in [aid 00:35:07] estimate, we then feed that data to a common database and you could then see over time given some of the variables that I just mentioned as with that question from the other caller about regionally where it is, who’s the client, what’s the vertical and how did we do on that job? You can put all those factors together and that’s where the stats come from.

Scott Seltz:

I see. I see. The question occurred to me, what are some primary benefits that are realised when we’re replacing point solutions and platforms?

Mark Edwards:

I’m sorry, say that one more time, Scott.

Scott Seltz:

I’m sorry. The question occurred to me, what are some primary benefits that are realised when replacing point solutions with end-to-end platforms?

Mark Edwards:

Got it, thank you. So the benefits they’re several. One of them obviously is the elimination of the people clubbing data in between the point solutions. The point solutions almost always are meant to focus on a particular problem. So, utility locating system, right? It does really good at sourcing where those are and you can update it based on places, things that you’ve placed, et cetera, but then it doesn’t talk to anything. And so somebody has to use that as they’re doing their daily planning to determine, okay, are there utilities in the area and reference that. So these point solutions are really good, but it takes a lot of people because they’re just not connected.

Mark Edwards:

So that’s one. We start to eliminate this re-keying and the people associated with that, and obviously there’s a sort of a data problem there too with inaccuracy in data. It also, just the number of systems you’ve got to pay attention to when really you need to be paying attention to the work, getting the work done, and sometimes having so many point solutions like that can be very distracting and actually feels like sometimes that your job is about systems rather than building some work.

Scott Seltz:

Another viewer asked, can you share what mathematical models are driving the PSI and safety analytics?

Mark Edwards:

No, that’s a customer. First, I don’t know the whole mathematical model. That’s certainly a customer specific thing and would be different depending on the work that you do, but the value there is really understanding what variables are best predictors for you and developing a model to do that.

Scott Seltz:

Right. Another question from a viewer. Have you prepared a case study in regard to best practices for a GC such as construction?

Mark Edwards:

Yes. InEight has several case studies across some of our customers that highlight different areas of things that they’ve done. So for example, a customer that’s implemented part of the InEight solutions and what has been the benefit to their company to do that. So, yes, we have several case studies. I think some of them are actually on our website.

Scott Seltz:

Along those lines another viewer is asking, what does a partnership with InEight look like? Would this start with working together on one project or by its nature does it require a full company integration in order to see benefits?

Mark Edwards:

That’s a good question. It doesn’t need to be a full company integration. We’ve seen lots of project specific benefits. I’ve actually worked with a couple of customers in Australia that took the very first couple of steps that I talked about. One is, bring in a way to consolidate the data and visualize it, and then let’s go get after document management for example, and we can do that on one project. And the great thing is then once you start to see the value of that on one project, that starts to mushroom into project two, because those individuals from that job see the benefit, they go off to … Most of the time you take the groups that run work and they might go off onto three or four other projects. And so that benefit is realised in that, that end plus one project, but also we can then do more. We can add another couple modules from an InEight suite perspective. And because they’re kind of pre-integrated from a data perspective, you don’t have to address that, and it just becomes one of these things that the benefit feeds on the benefit.

Scott Seltz:

Good. A question that occurred from me to you during the presentation, and I’d like to voice it to you is, what are the key factors driving a change in attitudes and behavior towards integrated project data?

Mark Edwards:

I think there’s two that I think are key. One is what owners are requiring. Owners are more and more wanting to be involved in the work, want to see and be involved in the operation, not necessarily that they’re going to staff it, but they want to know what’s going on, especially with the pandemic and what we’ve seen in the economy and the money that is going to be spent on capital projects, everybody’s tighter than they’ve ever been. And so every dime has to go to really showing benefit and progress. And so I think the economical tightness that we’re going through is driving owners to want to be more and more involved and understand that their money is being well spent, and, if there’s going to be an over-budget or an under budget situation, they need to know that early so they can address that. That’s number one.

Mark Edwards:

And then probably related is just the, every estimate gets squeezed like a son of a gun on margin. And so with introducing a bunch of overhead to manipulate data and push data between all these systems, that’s in order to realise some of your margin, you need to probably be more efficient and get rid of some of those re-keying activities. So I think it’s really those couple of things, the tightness with respect to how money is going to get managed, then there’s just going to be less money to build big stuff, making sure we do it right, and give owners the right visibility, but yet continue to keep our margins where they need to be by addressing some of the productivity and the overhead staff that we’ve got on some of these projects.

Scott Seltz:

I agree. Well, it looks like we’ve gone through our questions from our audience. Please join me in thanking Mark Edwards for his presentation, as well as our sponsor, InEight. If you do have a question or comment, please don’t hesitate to click the email us button on the console, and we’ll share those with Mark so he can respond directly to you. Please visit enr.com/webinars for the archive of this presentation to share with your colleagues as well as information about our upcoming events. Make sure to tune back in for tomorrow’s webinar, ensuring the safety of women workers companies need to know, airing at 2:00 PM Eastern Standard Time. We hope you found this webinar to have been a good investment of your time. Thank you, and have a great day.